The Nanostar project has been presented on May 7-8, at the UC3M Investigation Workshop.

More details at https://eventos.uc3m.es/34532/detail/i-jornadas-de-investigacion-eps-leganes.html

 

We inform to all the students participating in the NANOSTAR Student Challenges Phase I that the deadline has been postponed from May 11th to May 13th at 23:59.

 

• Phase I registration closed on April 11th.
• The total number of registered students has been 103, which exceeds expectations!

This Phase I is a competitive challenge, in which multidisciplinary teams of students from the NANOSTAR universities will have to predesign a nanosatellite space mission to the Moon. The nanosatellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface, while executing a close-distance fly-by.

Students participate in the NANOSTAR challenges in teams. In this Phase I, the total number of registered students has raised to 103 students in 17 teams.

The idea is to learn together as they develop their system solution.
At the end of the competition, students will be asked to hand in a design file with the definition of their solution, a preliminary design report, and to showcase their results in a presentation. An Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, will evaluate the received designs and select the winning proposal.

The awarded design will be extended and serve as the baseline for the future NANOSTAR challenges, which will focus on the detailed development and testing of parts of a nanosatellite and related facilities.

 

Up to March 21st, a total of 75 students have enrolled. Other students can still join the challenge: Not too late!!

This phase 1 challenge consists in the predesign of a nanosatellite space mission to the Moon. The satellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface, while executing a close-distance fly-by.

Deadline registration: April 11, 2019

Last March 25 and 26 took place the NANOSTAR progress meeting at the Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) in Lisbon, the largest and oldest engineering School in Portugal, with more than 40 years of experience in aerospace science and technology.

At the NANOSTAR progress meeting in Lisbon this week, we reviewed the actions, Work Packages and progress on Student Challenges phase 1 and discussion on phase 2. We had also the opportunity to visit the NANOSTAR ROOM at IST facilities.

Thank you to all the IST team for this great meeting!

Portugal has recently approved the creation of its Space Agency: PortugalSpace. It will coordinate the launch program for small satellites. Good news for the NANOSTAR project !!

Today at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, our students just took a hands-on course on IDM-CIC and IDM-VIEW, two fundamental tools that need to be mastered to do an efficient preliminary mission design.

Our nanosatellite to the Moon is getting closer and closer…!

NANOSTAR Student Challenges Phase I

Student teams from all universities compete to create the best preliminary design of a Moon-flyby CubeSat mission according to a given set of requirements. Winners receive an award and are tasked with the systems engineering of the rest of the mission.

Astre’nogs is a challenge supportted by six Toulouse students members of Astre association.

These antennas will be part of an open source global network of satellite ground-stations named Satnogs. They will be made available to the scientific community and will enable to receive UHF and VHF frequencies.

Astre’Nogs challenge is funded by the Interreg SUDOE project NANOSTAR.

This phase 1 challenge consists in the predesign of a nanosatellite space mission to the Moon. The satellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface, while executing a close-distance fly-by. Registration open: February 11, 2019 – April 11, 2019

This is a competitive challenge, in which multidisciplinary teams of students from the NANOSTAR universities will have to develop and present their design solutions to satisfy a set of mission requirements. Students will be assisted by expert faculty and learn how to create a space mission cooperatively in the framework of concurrent engineering.

How to participate

Students participate to the NANOSTAR challenges in teams. They can register with friends or ask to join a team of other students: the idea is to learn together as they develop their system solution. We encourage the participation of multidisciplinary, mixed teams of about 5 women and men. Students can participate with their university colleagues or form an international group that spans several NANOSTAR institutions.

Each team will be assigned an advisor who will be their point of contact with the NANOSTAR network.

At the end of the competition, students will be asked to hand in a design file with the definition of their solution, a preliminary design report, and to showcase their results in a presentation. An Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, will evaluate the received designs and select the winning proposal.
The awarded design will be extended and serve as the baseline for the future NANOSTAR challenges, which will focus on the detailed development and testing of parts of a nanosatellite and related facilities.

NANOSTAR project

NANOSTAR is a European project to support the training and development of student nanosatellites in the south west of Europe.

NANOSTAR project is funded by the Interreg Sudoe Programme through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The project has a planned duration of 30 months and a total budget of 2 million euros.

The consortium is composed of 2 aerospace clusters, 7 universities plus 3 ESA-BIC centres as associates, in France, Spain and Portugal.

For more information, please contact:

Marion GARITEAU gariteau@aerospace-valley.com

 

Congratulations!