If you are participating in the NANOSTAR Space Mission Predesign Challenge 2nd edition, please, take a look at these videos and documents regarding the 1st edition. They can be very useful for the new competition!

• Video of the best overall team (team MOON INVADERS):

• PDR and video of the best PDR document  (team CUBESAT-CHEFS):

Download the PDR here.

• Video of the best oral presentation (team SELENE):

• Video of the most-innovative mission (team JANUS-X):

• Video of the best management practices (team EIRB’STRONG):

 

 

The 3rd edition of the “Innovation Challenges” event will take place at the ENSEIRB-MATMECA on Monday, September 30th, 2019 from 9am to 5.30pm and will bring together 2nd year students from all sectors of the school.

The objective of this event is to allow students to work on a challenge in a phase of idea search, solution and feasibility study. During this day, several challenges will be exposed to the student-engineers in the presence of representatives of companies and managers, with session of questions / answers, creation of the teams, progress on the project during the day, pitches and prize-giving at the end of the day.

The student-engineers whose idea is selected will continue to work on a prototype (software / hardware) during the semester for a final oral presentation and demonstration in front of representatives of companies.

Our partner, Olivier Marty, will present the NANOSTAR project during this event.

The list of challenges are :

  • Challenge UAM : la mobilité aérienne de demain grâce aux drones
  • Challenge Nanostar : développement de nano satellite pour des missions précises
  • Challenge Talent for France : imagine une solution innovante, durable & éco-responsable !
  • Challenge Thales : inventez les nouvelles technologies qui amélioreront les secteurs d’activité du groupe Thales!
  • Safran – Black Out Challenge : votre défi est de proposer des solutions pour résoudre une crise planétaire
  • SEB Tech Challenge : imaginez le produit du petit équipement domestique de demain

More information: https://enseirb-matmeca.bordeaux-inp.fr/fr/les-defis-de-linnovation-de-lenseirb-matmeca-1

 

The winners of the first edition of the Space Mission Predesign NANOSTAR Challenge, MOON INVADERS, from Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), have presented their work today at the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA) at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom). Congratulations!!

MOON INVADERS team (Francisca Oliveira, Gustavo Ribeiro, Jorge Benedicto, Flávio Rosa, Pedro Dente and Emanuel Castanho), the winners of the first edition of the Space Mission Predesign NANOSTAR Challenge, are these days at the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA).

SSEA provides an international stage for students and academics to discuss current and future Space Educational Activities in Europe and beyond, focusing on university level activities as well as opportunities for learners and educators at high school.

Talks will showcase student projects, some involving real missions in which students design and build satellites which are launched and operated in space. Other topics include: technologies for training the next generation of space engineers and scientists; how universities and employers can work together so that graduates have the skills needed by industry, and improving the representation of women in the sector.

 The online registration for the second edition of the Space Mission Predesign Challenge is open.

NEW DEADLINE: November 4, 2019!!!!!

NANOSTAR is a European project to support the training and development of student nanosatellites in the south west of Europe.

This NANOSTAR challenge consists in predesigning a nanosatellite that will perform an ambitious scientific mission.

The goal of the mission is to verify the survivability in space of a marine photosymbiotic species of worms (Roscoff worms), which may one day play an essential role in the creation of artificial ecosystems for deep space exploration missions.

The scientific payload will monitor the metabolism of the worms and their efficiency for urea and air recycling via video observations and measurements.

Student teams must create a preliminary design of a complete space system to achieve this mission, using the tools and methodology provided by NANOSTAR.

How to participate

Students participate to the NANOSTAR challenges in teams. We encourage the participation of multidisciplinary, mixed teams of about 5 women and men. Students can participate with their university colleagues or form an international group that spans several NANOSTAR institutions.

Each team will be assigned an advisor who will be the point of contact with the NANOSTAR network. An Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, will evaluate the received designs and select the winning proposal. The awarded design will be extended and serve as the baseline for the future NANOSTAR challenges, which will focus on the detailed development and testing of parts of a nanosatellite and related facilities.

Awards

All participating students will receive a Participation Diploma from NANOSTAR as proof of the work carried out in the Design Challenge.

Other awards, which may comprise economic and/or material prizes (e.g. attendance to an International Conference to present their work, or a visit to a space center), may be awarded to the First Team, and will be defined soon and announced on the NANOSTAR website.

  • Registration open: September 2, 2019 – November 4, 2019
  • Challenge start: September 2, 2019
  • Deliverable submission deadline: January 5, 2020
  • Evaluation period: January 6-24, 2020
  • Winner Announcement: January 30, 2020

NANOSTAR project

The nanosatellite standard is today used by many universities and companies to attract the best students and engineers, that supports the universities and industries competitiveness.

Several countries from the north of Europe have strongly invested in this approach, creating a commercial offer that has become very well positioned in the market. However, Southern Europe, despite its strong influence in the space sector, has only 14% of the projects in the European nanosatellite sector and no company created in this field.

The construction of a nanosatellite requires numerous tools and competences, which makes it an excellent training vector. However, it is necessary to have the appropriate experience, hence the need to work in a network and exchange experiences.

To support the emergence of such a dynamic environment in the south west of Europe, 7 universities and 2 aerospace clusters from France, Spain and Portugal have proposed a collaborative project to link their resources, plus 3 ESA-BIC (Business Incubation Centres of the European Space Agency) as associates.

NANOSTAR: a network of excellence among universities, the regional industry and the scientific ecosystem in order to create a leading platform in Europe on nanosatellites.

The challenge of the project is to provide students with the experience of a real space engineering process that includes all stages, from conception and specifications, to design, assembly, integration, testing and documentation. That is, the whole process through a network that combines high-level engineering careers and entrepreneurial ventures in the area of ​​nanosatellites.

The MTT-Sat Challenge is a worldwide competition for teams of undergraduate and graduate students to design and build radio frequency (RF) and microwave hardware for small satellites.

The most promising designs will undergo space environmental qualification testing and will be incorporated in a cubesat, which will be launched into orbit (in case MTT-Sat Challenge secures enough funding and a participation in cubesat projects).

The main goal of the MTT-Sat Challenge is to advance space RF and microwave education, inspire students to pursue science and engineering education and careers, and prepare tomorrow’s leaders with the interdisciplinary teamwork skills, which are necessary for success. The MTT-Sat Challenge is managed by the IEEE Microwave Theory & Techniques Society (IEEE MTT-S), a federally-incorporated not-for-profit organization, with additional experts and advisors in the field.

The deadline for submission is October, 1, 2019, 11 pm (Hawaii Standard Time, HST).

More information: https://www.mtt.org/mttsat/index.html

ESA invites university student teams from ESA Member States, Canada and Slovenia that are developing a one, two or three-unit CubeSat with mainly educational objectives to propose their satellite for the new edition of the “Fly Your Satellite!” (FYS) programme.

Fly Your Satellite! is an educational programme for university students, created by ESA after the launch of seven university CubeSats on the 2012 Vega maiden flight. Six teams participated in the first edition of the programme, which concluded in 2016 with the launch of three satellites, while in parallel a pilot edition was undertaken to deploy a satellite from the International Space Station. The second edition of Fly Your Satellite! is currently ongoing since 2017, and participating university teams are advancing closer towards testing and launch. The call for proposals for the third edition is now open.

The aim of the programme is to support university student teams throughout the design, assembly, integration, testing, and verification process of their educational CubeSats. By participating in the programme, students will implement standard practices for spacecraft development; receive support from experienced ESA specialists; attend tailored training courses; and will be offered access to state-of-the-art test facilities.

For the current call, launch opportunities to LEO are envisioned. Teams should indicate in their CubeSat Proposal the range of orbits to which they are compatible in terms of mission objectives, ground coverage, system performance, etc. Launches from the International Space Station may be offered within the programme, and as those launches may be more readily available due to recurrent resupply flights, compatibility with the ISS safety requirements and orbit is strongly recommended.

Student teams can apply by submitting a proposal describing their CubeSat project and demonstrating its maturity. Throughout the proposal, teams must show that the project is compliant with the programmatic and technical requirements of the Fly Your Satellite! programme.

Teams accepted into the programme will work on different stages of the final design, assembly, integration, and verification of their CubeSat and ground station, in preparation for the launch and mission operations. ESA specialists will guide them through the necessary processes and preparation of requested documentation packages and will evaluate the student team’s work. The programme is structured in multiple phases, following the typical development cycle of a space mission, and student teams will need to pass project reviews to advance to each subsequent phase. The launch will be offered by ESA to those teams that demonstrate the readiness of their spacecraft and ground segment and compatibility with the technical and safety requirements. Once in orbit, teams are supported in the operational phase and will share mission data and technical or scientific results.

Application – Open!

This opportunity is open to university student teams from ESA Member States, Canada and Slovenia.

The submission deadline for proposals is 13 October 2019 at 23:59 CEST.

A Selection Workshop for the shortlisted teams is expected to take place in December 2019 at ESTEC in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Source: https://www.esa.int/Education/CubeSats_-_Fly_Your_Satellite/Fly_Your_Satellite!_3_call_for_proposals

 

Isae-Supaero, in collaboration with Onera and the University of Toulouse, has produced EntrySat, a small satellite designed to study the atmospheric re-entry of space debris. This small satellite, a Cubesat of 3 units, was launched on July 3 from the International Space Station.

Furthermore, Robusta-1C MTCube, a cubesat of 1 unit, was launched on July 5 from Soyuz at Vostochny from CSU Montpellier.

Source: https://www.futura-sciences.com/sciences/actualites/debris-spatiaux-entrysat-iss-largue-debris-spatial-mission-inedite-76715/?utm_content=actu&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=futura

 

MOON INVADERS from Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain).

In this Phase I competitive challenge, 15 multidisciplinary teams of students from the NANOSTAR universities have predesigned a nanosatellite space mission to the Moon. The nanosatellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface, while executing a close-distance fly-by.

The total number of registered students has raised to 103 students, which exceedes expectations!

The students have been asked to hand in a design file with the definition of their solution, a preliminary design report, and to showcase their results in a presentation.

The Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, have evaluated the received designs and selected the winning proposal. The evaluation has been made based on:

• Compliancy with the top-level requirements of the mission
• Project consistency, risk analysis, and physical soundness
• Maximization of the mission figures of merit
• Solution innovativeness
• Document quality
• Presentation quality
• Team management and organization
• Team size, multidisciplinarity, gender balance, and interinstitutionality
• Correct usage of NANOSTAR resources, tools, and methodology

FIRST PRIZE. Best Team Ranking Top 5:

  1. MOON INVADERS from Universidade da Beira Interior, UBI (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Gustavo Ribeiro (UBI); Jorge Benedicto (UPM); Francisca Oliveira (UBI); Flávio Rosa (UBI); Pedro Dente (UBI); Emanuel Castanho (UBI).
  2. CUBESAT CHEFS from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): David Tomás Gaitán Rodríguez; Santiago de la Riva; Javier Gómez del Pulgar Vázquez; Miguel Herrera Arozamena; Alberto Marin Cebrián.
  3. JANUS-X from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Guillermo Escribano; Carlos Paulete; Pau Gago Padreny; Pedro Jiménez; Alejandro Cano Sánchez.
  4. L.U.N.A. from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Inés Gordo Esteban; Javier Cortina Fernández; Manuel Gavilán Herrera; Enrique Díaz Arenas; Javier Bel Diaz.
  5. LASAR-SAT from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Raquel Rodríguez Cañas; Lara Sánchez; Anastasiya Osik; Susana Porras; Adrián Capitán.

Best predesign document:

CUBESAT CHEFS from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): David Tomás Gaitán Rodríguez; Santiago de la Riva; Javier Gómez del Pulgar Vázquez; Miguel Herrera Arozamena; Alberto Marin Cebrián.

Most innovative mission:

JANUS-X from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Guillermo Escribano; Carlos Paulete; Pau Gago Padreny; Pedro Jiménez; Alejandro Cano Sánchez.

Best management practices:

EIRB’STRONG from ENSEIRB-MATMECA (France): Louis Goutorbe; Louis Grauwin; Olivier Tomas; Oumayma Belkhadra; Pierre Ferrer; Othmane Ahl Zouaoui; Noureddine Khanfir; Amine Alinsafi; Fakhareddine Sabbari.

Best oral presentation:

SELENE from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Alejandro Fernández Herrero; David Fernandez Pulido; Ignacio Garcia Guerrero; Gabriel Andújar Saltoratto; Imanol Sardon Delgado; Carlos Rodríguez Jamilena

Congratulations to the winners and all participating student teams!

The First Prize Team has the chance to act as the Lead Systems Engineering Team to coordinate the future NANOSTAR challenges, where their design solution will serve as the baseline to develop and test several subsystems of their nanosatellite across the NANOSTAR institutions. And the team will attend the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA) at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom) to present their work.

Download the press release

Phase 1 Challenge re-edition

A new preliminary design challenge competition will start in September and will now focus on the design of a nanosatellite mission embedding a living payload for a microgravity experimentation: Roscoff Worms. Again, winners shall receive specific awards like in the previous challenge edition.

 

On 20th and 21st May 2019, the students from Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal) attended a Workshop on IDM with Jean-Luc Le Gal.

Yesterday, Monday May 13 at 23:59 the Phase I Deliverables Submission was closed. Now starts the evaluation period.

This NANOSTAR challenge consists in the predesign of a nanosatellite/small satellite space mission to the Moon. The satellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface at a close distance during a fly-by.

The Evaluation Committee is composed by one member from each NANOSTAR institution, and will apply the same criteria to the evaluation of all student proposals.

The NANOSTAR Evaluation Committee shall convene and evaluate all the valid submitted projects to determine the winning proposal.

Evaluation will be carried out based on:

 Compliancy with the top-level requirements of the mission
 Project consistency, risk analysis, and physical soundness
 Maximization of the mission figures of merit (refer to the mission requirements document)
 Solution innovativeness
 Document quality
 Presentation quality
 Team management and organization
 Team size, multidisciplinarity, gender balance, and interinstitutionality
 Correct usage of NANOSTAR resources, tools, and methodology.

Good luck to all participants!

NANOSTAR: A collaborative platform to provide a relevant training on nanosat technology through Student Challenges.

NANOSTAR is funded by the Interreg Sudoe Programme through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

The project has a planned duration of 30 months and a total budget of 2 million euros.

The consortium is composed of 7 universities and 2 aerospace clusters, plus 3 ESA Business Incubation Centres as associates, in France, Spain and Portugal.