After 40 months, the NANOSTAR project held its final event last May 11, where more than 25 speakers shared the project’s achievements with the European nanosatellite community.

The NANOSTAR students will become the future main players in the field of nanosatellites in a more connected Europe.

We are facing a revolution in Space where small satellites are increasingly important and getting better every year. In this race, it is key to improve the capabilities of young people in space related activities. This is the ‘leitmotiv’ of the NANOSTAR project funded by the Interreg Sudoe Programme through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). And that was the main message emphasized by Philippe Lattes, Director for Space Activities at Aerospace Valley, who introduced the NANOSTAR Final Event by thanking all the partners for the work done during the project and Isabelle Roger, Director of the Interreg Programme SUDOE and Alexandre Legall, Project Officer at Interreg Programme SUDOE, for their Support.

NANOSTAR has developed a common software infrastructure to design nanosatellites with the same tools, homogenizing the process. And also a robust work methodology for the design, development and testing of nanosatellites. Thibault Gateau, from the Institut Supérieur de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace presented the  Software Suite and José Miguel Álvarez, from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, the common methodology. Afterwards, Jean-Luc Le Gal, from the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, explained the evolution of the IDM-CIC environment modules.

But the core of the project is the Student Challenges. Filippo Cichocki, from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and Anthony Ghiotto, from Bordeaux INP, gave some figures: almost 300 students from the NANOSTAR universities have been involved in 2 space missions predesign challenges and more than 50 detailed design & test challenges.

In the first mission, developed between February and May 2019, 15 multidisciplinary teams of students predesigned a flyby mission to the Moon. The nanosatellite, equipped with a scientific payload, performs observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface.

In the second mission, from September 2019 to January 2020, the goal was to verify the survivability in space of a marine photosymbiotic species of worms (the Roscoff worms), and their efficiency for air recycling, which may one day play an essential role in the creation of artificial ecosystems for deep space exploration missions. Xavier Bailly, CNRS, Roscoff Marine Station and Olivier Marty, B-INP / URISA – IESF NA, explained more in detail the worms project.

And from September 2019 to March 2021, the students from the NANOSTAR universities have been working on different detailed design & test challenges. In the morning final event, the best 10 teams presented their projects, and the NANOSTAR jury panel selected the best three teams, which were announced in the afternoon event by Carlos Romero, Managing Director of Madrid Aerospace Cluster:

  • 1st Position:Development of an inertial morphing nanosatellite’, is the result of the collaboration between Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, and Instituto Universitario de Microgravedad ‘Ignacio Da Riva’, from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, with the support of the DZH student research group. Participating students: Jesús Muñoz Tejeda, Miguel Segovia Mora, Alberto Rodríguez Amor, Ivan Castro Fernández, Carlos San Miguel Ortego and Carmen García Cabetas.
  • 2nd Position:Telecom System Qualification: Sounding Balloon’, from Bordeaux INP (B-INP). Participating students: Nigel Ignatowicz, Yohan Bellanger, Edgar De Oliveira Cruz, Antton Bodin and Vanlerberghe Francois.
  • 3rd Position:Design and Analysis of Nanosatellite Additive Manufactured structures’ from Universidade da Beira Interior (UBI). Participating students: Pedro Neto, Marcos Rosa and Rose Teixeira.

During the event, also had the testimony of three students teams: ‘UC3M StarWorms’, the winners of the first challenge: Alvaro Sanz Casado, Carlos Alvaro Arroyo Parejo, Miguel Renieblas Ariño, Sergio Sarasola Merino, Miguel Muñoz Lorente. ‘B-INP EirBalloon’: Nigel Ignatowicz, Yohan Bellanger. And UBI Moon invader’, the winners of the second challenge: Franscisca Oliveira and Pedro Dente

Finally, Jorge Monteiro, from Universidade da Beira Interior, explained the paths for the future of NANOSTAR and next steps. The mission is to open satellite project engineering to everyone, by training professionals and developing open-source concurrent engineering tools for education and research. NANOSTAR is actively looking into the future!

The conductor of the event and the Nanostar Project Manager, Maude Perier-Camby, from Aerospace Valley, closed the session with the final video of the Project. Hope you enjoy!

Download the Press Release here

 

Last Tuesday May 11th, NANOSTAR celebrated its final event, where all the partners had the opportunity of sharing the project’s results with the European Nanosatellite community.

In the morning, the best 10 teams of the NANOSTAR Detailed Design and Test Challenges presented their projects. The NANOSTAR jury panel selected the best three teams, which were announced in the afternoon event.

During 18 months, the students from the NANOSTAR universities have been working on different detailed design & test challenges. We want to thank all the teams for their great presentations and the excellent work carried out during this project. It has been very difficult to make a final decision on the winners as all the projects are high level. The top three teams are:

  • 1st Position: ‘Development of an inertial morphing nanosatellite’, is the result of the collaboration between Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, and Instituto Universitario de Microgravedad ‘Ignacio Da Riva’, from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, with the support of the DZH student research group. Participating students: Jesús Muñoz Tejeda, Miguel Segovia Mora, Alberto Rodríguez Amor, Ivan Castro Fernández, Carlos San Miguel Ortego and Carmen García Cabetas. More information.
  • 2nd Position: ‘Telecom System Qualification: Sounding Balloon’, from Bordeaux INP (B-INP). Participating students: Nigel Ignatowicz, Yohan Bellanger, Edgar De Oliveira Cruz, Antton Bodin and Vanlerberghe Francois. More information.
  • 3rd Position: ‘Design and Analysis of Nanosatellite Additive Manufactured structures’ from Universidade da Beira Interior (UBI). Participating students: Pedro Neto, Marcos Rosa and Rose Teixeira. More information.

Congratulations!

 

A total of 11 teams and 21 students from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) participated in these challenges.

Last May 5th, NANOSTAR held at UC3M the awards ceremony of all the students of this university who have participated in the detailed design and test challenges of the NANOSTAR project. The students received USB pens, t-shirts, 3D engraved crystals, sets of engraved pens, coffee cups, or nanostar key-chains, all featuring the official NANOSTAR logo.

Congratulations to all participating students for the incredible results obtained!

The projects can be further consulted here.

The winning team was LIGHT PACE, composed by the students Juan Alfaro Moreno and Isaac Robledo Martín. Congratulations to the winners and to all participating students!

On April 13, 14 and 19, a 3-day ARDUINO hackathon was organized in the context of the NANOSTAR Student Challenges at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), thanks to the commitment and relevant contribution of the STAR students association and specially Miguel González Antohi, UC3M student.

The hackathon goal was to control a 1U cubesat attitude, with the use of a DC motor and an ARDUINO board, thus making a lateral cubesat face point towards a light source. Four teams of 2 students participated in this challenge and their design was evaluated by a jury composed by the NANOSTAR professors Filippo Cichocki and Mario Merino.

NANOSTAR is ready for landing! After 40 months fostering a relevant training on nanosat technology, we celebrate our final event “NANOSTAR Academy Showcase”, where we will share the project’s results with the European Nanosatellite community. Join us next May 11th at 14:00h CET!

Last week our colleague, Thibault GateauISAE-SUPAERO responsible for the NANOSTAR project, presented our project as an example of academic collaboration at the Aerospace Valley’s ‘The Space week’.

 

The winning student team “UC3M StarWorms” of the Second Edition of the Space Mission Predesign Challenge of the NANOSTAR project,  have  been awarded officially at UC3M with various diplomas:

  • participation
  • best PDR document
  • and best team

Also a laptop per team component, and other small prizes: USB pendrives and NANOSTAR t-shirts.

Congratulations to the team and well done!

From left to right: Carlos Álvaro Arroyo Parejo, Miguel Renieblas Ariño, Alvaro Sánz Casado, Sergio Sarasola, Miguel Muñoz Lorente with Filippo Cichocki, the NANOSTAR Student Challenges coordinator.

The Eirballoon project is part of the NANOSTAR project and the 100th anniversary of the ENSEIRB-MATMECA engineering school, based in Bordeaux (France), partner of the NANOSTAR consortium.

A team composed of five students from the ENSEIRB-MATMECA engineering school will launch a sounding balloon to take pictures of Bordeaux from the sky and measure properties of the atmosphere such as temperature, pressure or UV ray level. All these parameters will be sent to the ground in real time using the LoRa protocol and displayed on social media. The balloon will reach about 30 km in altitude and will allow testing hardware (including the Lora module) in space conditions together with the ground station developed within the NANOSTAR project.

This is a great opportunity for the students to apply the skills provided in IoT and electronics.

 
 

With the support of NANOSTAR, our partner Universidade da Beira Interior (UBI, Portugal) is now developing a student CubeSat project called CUBISat. The objective is to develop a 1U CubeSat technology demonstrator for an Attitude and Dynamics control System.


Magnetic attitude determination and control devices are one of the cheapest most reliable, small and lightweight attitude systems. However, they have limitations, in particular a relatively low accuracy and actuation capability requiring other attitude sensors and actuators. Theoretical studies demonstrate that a solely magnetic Attitude Determination and Control system might be capable of providing three-axis orbital attitude for nanosatellites. To test the proposed algorithms for future space missions a technology demonstrator is needed.

In this activity, the students are performing a health check on a CubeSat reaction wheel that would be used in the CUBISAT.

Students involved:

Supervisor: Jorge Monteiro

 

Our colleague, Thibault Gateau, ISAE-SUPAERO responsible for the NANOSTAR project, presents their innovative purchase for the 3rd episode of Achat public et Innovation Podcast. Play below!