NANOSTAR Student Challenges Phase II: 68 students in 22 different challenges

Last Monday, February 17, the phase II Detailed Design and Test Challenges online registration was closed.

In this phase, each NANOSTAR institution offered specific challenges on the design, development and testing of nanosatellite components. Some of these challenges were related to components of the winner nanosatellite design of the first preliminary design competition (lunar fly-by), others to nanosatellite testing facilities and there will also be a challenge on the detailed design of a roscoff worms payload, considered in the second edition of the preliminary design competition.

There have been a total of  68 registered students in 22 different challenges.

The NANOSTAR project

NANOSTAR is a collaborative platform to provide a relevant training on nanosat technology through Student Challenges.

The nanosatellite standard is today used by many universities and companies to attract the best students and engineers, that supports the universities and industries competitiveness.

Several countries from the north of Europe have strongly invested in this approach, creating a commercial offer that has become very well positioned in the market. However, Southern Europe, despite its strong influence in the space sector, has only 14% of the projects in the European nanosatellite sector and no company created in this field.

The consortium is composed of 2 aerospace clusters, 7 universities plus 3 ESA-BIC centres as associates, in France, Spain and Portugal.

NANOSTAR project is funded by the Interreg Sudoe Programme through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

 

30 years of Interreg: youngsters closer to the moon thanks to NANOSTAR

This year Interreg celebrates its 30th birthday, focusing on three topics of interest for the European cohesion: youth, a greener Europe and we all have a neighbor. In this context, each month, they will interview one of their  emblematic projects related to one of these topics.

We transcribe the interview with Filippo Cichocki, visiting professor at the Carlos III University of Madrid who, together with his colleague Julio Posada Román and the professors José Antonio García Souto and Mario Merino Martínez, coordinate the NANOSTAR Student Challenges.

NANOSTAR offers to university students the possibility of experiencing a real and complete space-engineering process that includes conception, design, assembly and documentation. In teams, students can draft a space mission with a nano-satellite and create parts of it.

  • What role do young people play in your project?

The NANOSTAR project is based on several challenges according to which the role of young people varies. Some challenges are competitive: students register to compete for the preliminary design of a nano-satellite mission. Organized in groups, they design the principal subsystems of nano-satellite in order to accomplish this mission and compete with other groups of students from their same university or from other universities participating in the NANOSTAR project. Moreover, there are other types of challenges, more independent, organized by the universities of the project focusing on the development of a particular technology for nano-satellites. This can be a communications component, a control strategy or a testing platform. Since the project has a wide nature, the activities developed for the challenges vary as well.

  • How important are these challenges for the proper development of the project?

The two types of challenges of the project present significant activities for a space engineer.

On one side, the competitive challenges look like the procedures of the European Space Agency for the selection of promising space-mission proposals that can be financed for the phases of detailed design and finally reach the operational phase. The first challenge was a competitive challenge. Developed between February and May 2019, it consisted of a flyby mission to the moon with a nano-satellite. Counting with the participation of 15 teams, it brought together more than 100 students. The second competitive challenge has just ended and focused on a different mission: a payload mission, with Roscoff worms that allow to recycle CO2 and produce O2, very useful for the development of ECLSS – Environmental Control and Life Support Systems.

On the other side, individual challenges will start in the next weeks and will allow students from each university to advance in concrete skills related to detailed phases of a nano-satellite design. These usually start when the preliminary design of a mission is approved and a space agency, such as the European Space Agency, decides to continue financing these activities. So far, we organized around 30 different challenges among all the universities involved in NANOSTAR project.

  •  Where does the idea of ​​NANOSTAR come from? What is the added value of having young people in this project?

It is a great added value. First, young people interested in this sector are very motivated and have a lot of passion for what they do. Even if they don’t have a very long experience, they are able, with advice, to perform very advanced engineering tasks.

On the other hand, in NANOSTAR, we believe in hands-on education, thanks to which students develop all the competences for their future job as space engineers. In this sense, the nano-satellites presents a clear asset, not just as an educative tool, but also for the intrinsic interest that students develop for this type of industry that in the last years has certainly grown. Finally, and this is the a reason for a SUDOE project, there is a technological gap in South-West Europe of this specific technology and there is no better way to bridge this gap than to bet on the training of young people.

  • What does NANOSTAR provide to the youngsters who participate?

It is a very positive point for your curricula to be able to participate in a public competition for the design of a nano-satellite, financed by the EU and with a strong participation. In addition, the project benefits from experts’ advices of prestigious universities. Participating to these challenges allows students to develop knowledge that may not be developed in an ordinary university course. They can put into practice their knowledge developing a space mission, systems engineering, managing of special projects or in the detailed design of a nano-satellite component, while learning to work in a team with other European students. The challenges teach them to be patient, rigorous, organizing periodic meetings to progress with the design, knowing how to respond to casualties in the team.

  • How do you organize work in universities of different countries?

Each University has its own work culture and their area of expertise, so they complement each other. Generally, the student groups are from the same universities but we also had interuniversity groups. This is very positive because it allows us to evaluate whether it is possible to work as a team from different universities and what difficulties it entails. Obviously, physical distance can be an obstacle, but through the project, we seek to develop common work methodologies. Thus, we develop a common software to design nano-satellites, with the same tools, homogenizing the nano-satellite development process.

  • What is the profile of the students participating?

They are mostly space-engineering students but we count also on students from other disciplines. This is essential because space engineering is totally interdisciplinary. Design involves different fields of knowledge. Thus, for example, electronic, telecommunication engineers but also mathematicians participate.

We also count on a gender mixed participation even if we have not reached yet the desired level of equality: in the last challenge, for example, about 80 people participated, of which approximately 20 were women. This figure is in line with the percentage of women in engineering department of Spanish universities (around 25%).

On the other hand, many universities have student associations dedicated to solving technological problems. We made the most of these by encouraging their participation because they are probably the best candidates since they have very motivated students, with a lot of practical experience and seek to achieve greater visibility. For example, we are developing one of the challenges with the STAR association of the Carlos III University that is dedicated to the development and launching of rockets as platform for the testing of nano-satellite components.

  • How do these types of projects influence the vision that young people have of the EU? How would you encourage young people to participate in the project?


The participation in this kind of networks allow to expose students to the education method of other countries and establish contacts with other similar students in South Europe. We believe that actions like these ones are very positive for foster the youngsters’ sense of belonging in the European Union. They link Europe with opportunities to develop concrete projects.

Without a doubt, NANOSTAR is a great opportunity to put into practice what they are learning in their academic training, work as a team and develop skills to work in the future in a more connected Europe.

Thank you very much Filippo! Do not hesitate to visit the project website and discover everything about space challenges. Also, we invite you to discover the testimonies of Alejandro and David, two students from Carlos III University who participated in the challenges.

 

UC3M StarWorms: winners of the 2nd edition of the Nanostar Preliminary Design Challenge

In this edition, thirteen multidisciplinary teams of students from the NANOSTAR universities have predesigned a nanosatellite space mission, whose goal is to verify the survivability in space of a marine photosymbiotic species of worms (Roscoff worms), which may one day play an essential role in the creation of artificial ecosystems for deep space exploration missions. The scientific payload of the nanosatellite will monitor the metabolism of the worms and their efficiency for air recycling via video observations and measurements.

The total number of registered students has been 82 students (13 teams), although only six teams have managed to deliver the requested work (a design file, a preliminary design report and an oral video presentation) within the competition deadline (January 6th).

The Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, thus specially congratulate these teams (Team Bernoulli, nanoMUSE, UPM StarWorms, Wormonauts, UC3M StarWorms and WOSS) for meeting such a strict deadline and for the great quality of the presented work. The evaluation has been made based on the criteria published at the website, which are:

• Compliancy with the top-level requirements of the mission
• Project consistency and physical soundness
• Risk analysis
• Mission performance
• Solution innovativeness
• Document quality
• Presentation quality
• Team management, communication and organization
• Correct usage of NANOSTAR resources, tools, and methodology
• Multidisciplinarity, gender balance, inter-institutionality and use of Nanostar communication tool

FIRST PRIZE. Best Team Ranking Top 3:

1. UC3M StarWorms from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Álvaro Sanz Casado (team leader), Carlos Álvaro Arroyo Parejo, Miguel Renieblas Ariño, Sergio Sarasola, Miguel Muñoz Lorente.

2. UPM StarWorms from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Gema Aparicio Cantalapiedra (team leader), César Díez Factor, Jonathan Martín Palomo, Fernando Ayape Alonso.

3. nanoMUSE from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Inés Vargas (team leader), David Moreno, Manuel Soto-Aranaz González, Alberto Rodríguez Pérez-Silva, Jaume Fortaleza Llorens.

Best predesign document:

UC3M StarWorms from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Álvaro Sanz Casado (team leader), Carlos Álvaro Arroyo Parejo, Miguel Renieblas Ariño, Sergio Sarasola, Miguel Muñoz Lorente.

Most innovative mission:

nanoMUSE from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Inés Vargas (team leader), David Moreno, Manuel Soto-Aranaz González, Alberto Rodríguez Pérez-Silva, Jaume Fortaleza Llorens.

Best management practices:

UPM StarWorms from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Gema Aparicio Cantalapiedra (team leader), César Díez Factor, Jonathan Martín Palomo, Fernando Ayape Alonso.

Best oral presentation:

Team Bernoulli from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Tomás Girona Gutiérrez (team leader), Gonzalo Azaña Caro, Daniel Gómez de Antonio, Néstor Martínez Ribera, José Luis Ramírez

Congratulations to the winners and all participating student teams!

All six teams that have submitted their work shall receive an official participation diploma. Additional diplomas shall be awarded to the teams that have won a special prize. The first prize team (UC3M StarWorms) shall be awarded both a laptop/person and the possibility to participate to the international nanosatellites conference 4S Symposium 2020 (Small Satellites Systems and Services) where they can present their mission design. This possibility shall be confirmed in the month of February.

Once again, the Nanostar evaluation committee wishes to thank all participating teams for their effort and for the great quality of the submitted work.

Download the press release here.

UC3M StarWorms from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, (Spain): Álvaro Sanz Casado (team leader), Carlos Álvaro Arroyo Parejo, Miguel Renieblas Ariño, Sergio Sarasola, Miguel Muñoz Lorente.

Evaluating the Space Mission Predesign Challenge 2nd edition

The Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, evaluating the received designs from student teams, and selecting the winning proposal at Bordeaux‐INP / ENSEIRBMATMECA.

This NANOSTAR challenge has consisted in predesigning a nanosatellite that will perform an ambitious scientific mission. The goal of the mission is to verify the survivability in space of a marine photosymbiotic species of worms (Roscoff worms), which may one day play an essential role in the creation of artificial ecosystems for deep space exploration missions. The scientific payload will monitor the metabolism of the worms and their efficiency for urea and air recycling via video observations and measurements.

 

CubeSat finds its way in space with Galileo receiver

A miniature CubeSat has become the first satellite to perform Galileo-based position fixes in orbit using a commercial satnav receiver.

CubeSats are nanosatellites based on standardised 10 cm-sized units. Originally devised for educational uses, they are nowadays being put to commercial and technology testing uses. The Swiss Astrocast company is assembling a constellation based on 3-unit CubeSats to serve the emerging ‘Internet of Things’.

Vigilant for new initiatives that foster innovation in the field of navigation, ESA navigation researchers supported Switzerland’s ETH Zurich technical university to fly a navigation payload – composed of four low-cost multi-constellation mass-market satnav receiver modules plus two antennas – aboard a test CubeSat.

“This mission has demonstrated the first use of Galileo to perform positioning and timing in orbit supporting precise orbit determination using a commercial product developed for ground users,” explains ESA’s Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) R&D Principal Engineer Roberto Prieto Cerdeira.

“The purpose of this initiative was to demonstrate the capabilities of Galileo in orbit with a small, low-cost, low-power European satnav receiver. This will pave the way for future navigation experimentation, scientific experiments and technology demonstrations of Galileo in orbit with CubeSats and low-cost receivers for scientific activities.

“The navigation payload is also capable of performing position fixes by combining Galileo with the US GPS, Russian Glonass and Chinese BeiDou systems for increased performance.”

ESA R&D navigation engineer Rok Dittrich adds: “The receiver itself was not specially developed and tested for space but is a modified version of a low-cost mass-market product from the Swiss u-blox company. It underwent ground testing emulating its use in space, along with firmware added to take into account the dynamics of low-Earth orbit.”

This opportunity, funded through ESA’s European GNSS Evolution programme, was conceived together with ESA’s Galileo Science Advisory Committee, a group of scientists advising ESA on scientific matters related to Galileo and fostering its scientific exploitation.

This first AstroCast CubeSat was launched in December 2018, and the first results confirming the use of Galileo satellites for positioning were reported at the recent Galileo Science Colloquium in Zurich, typically demonstrating orbital positioning precision down to less than 5 m.

ESA’s Galileo Navigation Science Office and GNSS Evolution are looking into extending this pioneering experience to perform more CubeSat-based experiments in space to test ideas for evolutions of European satnav systems and scientific experiments with Galileo, in partnership with universities and research institutions.

Satnav serving space

Satnav is already widely used by satellites in low-Earth orbit for guidance, navigation and control, relying on the satnav constellations flying above them in medium-Earth orbit. Some telecommunication and weather satellites in higher orbit also make use of the satnav signals flying at lower orbit, with very weak satnav signals from satellites located at the other side of the Earth.

For the future, satnav is a key enabling technology for the safe operation of low-Earth orbit constellations, allowing individual satellites to maintain optimum formation relative to the other constellation members.

ESA and NASA have previously demonstrated Galileo-only and Galileo-GPS fixes from the International Space Station, although using a space-qualified software-based receiver.

ESA is developing dual Galileo-GPS receivers for the next generation of Earth-observing Copernicus Sentinel satellites. The more precise the orbit determination, the more accurate the environmental data that can be returned to Earth.

Combined use of Galileo and GPS signals on an interoperable basis for positioning and precise orbit determination should bring significant advantages for space users in particular, set to provide a seamless navigation capability from low to high Earth orbits – and potentially beyond.

Source: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/CubeSat_finds_its_way_in_space_with_Galileo_receiver

NANOSTAR Detailed Design and Testing Challenges: Online registration is open!

NANOSTAR is a European project to support the training and development of student nanosatellites in the south west of Europe.

In this phase, each institution of the project will be offering specific challenges on the design, development and testing of nanosatellite components.

NANOSTAR specific design, development and testing challenges start!

In this project phase, each institution will support a large number of different design and testing challenges of nanosatellite components. Some of these challenges are related to components of the winner nanosatellite design of the first preliminary design competition, others to nanosatellite testing facilities, and there will also be a challenge on the detailed design of a Roscoff’s worms payload, which is a key component of the second edition of the preliminary design competition.

How to participate

Students participate to these specific challenges in teams (of any size). The advisor of each student group will be a member of the challenge-hosting institution.

We encourage students to register  and to indicate the specific challenge they are interested in!

At the end of each specific challenge, each team will have to deliver a report, based on the template that can be downloaded here.

Finally, each team will have the opportunity of presenting remotely the challenge work at a final NANOSTAR project event, to be announced soon.

NANOSTAR project

NANOSTAR is a collaborative platform to provide a relevant training on nanosat technology through Student Challenges.

The nanosatellite standard is today used by many universities and companies to attract the best students and engineers, that supports the universities and industries competitiveness.

Several countries from the north of Europe have strongly invested in this approach, creating a commercial offer that has become very well positioned in the market. However, Southern Europe, despite its strong influence in the space sector, has only 14% of the projects in the European nanosatellite sector and no company created in this field.

The consortium is composed of 2 aerospace clusters, 7 universities plus 3 ESA-BIC centres as associates, in France, Spain and Portugal.

NANOSTAR project is funded by the Interreg Sudoe Programme through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

MOON INVADERS at the SEEA conference

The winners of the first edition of the Space Mission Predesign NANOSTAR Challenge, MOON INVADERS, from Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), have presented their work today at the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA) at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom). Congratulations!!

MOON INVADERS team (Francisca Oliveira, Gustavo Ribeiro, Jorge Benedicto, Flávio Rosa, Pedro Dente and Emanuel Castanho), the winners of the first edition of the Space Mission Predesign NANOSTAR Challenge, are these days at the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA).

SSEA provides an international stage for students and academics to discuss current and future Space Educational Activities in Europe and beyond, focusing on university level activities as well as opportunities for learners and educators at high school.

Talks will showcase student projects, some involving real missions in which students design and build satellites which are launched and operated in space. Other topics include: technologies for training the next generation of space engineers and scientists; how universities and employers can work together so that graduates have the skills needed by industry, and improving the representation of women in the sector.

 The online registration for the second edition of the Space Mission Predesign Challenge is open.

NANOSTAR Space Mission Predesign Challenge Second edition: Online registration is open!

NEW DEADLINE: November 4, 2019!!!!!

NANOSTAR is a European project to support the training and development of student nanosatellites in the south west of Europe.

This NANOSTAR challenge consists in predesigning a nanosatellite that will perform an ambitious scientific mission.

The goal of the mission is to verify the survivability in space of a marine photosymbiotic species of worms (Roscoff worms), which may one day play an essential role in the creation of artificial ecosystems for deep space exploration missions.

The scientific payload will monitor the metabolism of the worms and their efficiency for urea and air recycling via video observations and measurements.

Student teams must create a preliminary design of a complete space system to achieve this mission, using the tools and methodology provided by NANOSTAR.

How to participate

Students participate to the NANOSTAR challenges in teams. We encourage the participation of multidisciplinary, mixed teams of about 5 women and men. Students can participate with their university colleagues or form an international group that spans several NANOSTAR institutions.

Each team will be assigned an advisor who will be the point of contact with the NANOSTAR network. An Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, will evaluate the received designs and select the winning proposal. The awarded design will be extended and serve as the baseline for the future NANOSTAR challenges, which will focus on the detailed development and testing of parts of a nanosatellite and related facilities.

Awards

All participating students will receive a Participation Diploma from NANOSTAR as proof of the work carried out in the Design Challenge.

Other awards, which may comprise economic and/or material prizes (e.g. attendance to an International Conference to present their work, or a visit to a space center), may be awarded to the First Team, and will be defined soon and announced on the NANOSTAR website.

  • Registration open: September 2, 2019 – November 4, 2019
  • Challenge start: September 2, 2019
  • Deliverable submission deadline: January 5, 2020
  • Evaluation period: January 6-24, 2020
  • Winner Announcement: January 30, 2020

NANOSTAR project

The nanosatellite standard is today used by many universities and companies to attract the best students and engineers, that supports the universities and industries competitiveness.

Several countries from the north of Europe have strongly invested in this approach, creating a commercial offer that has become very well positioned in the market. However, Southern Europe, despite its strong influence in the space sector, has only 14% of the projects in the European nanosatellite sector and no company created in this field.

The construction of a nanosatellite requires numerous tools and competences, which makes it an excellent training vector. However, it is necessary to have the appropriate experience, hence the need to work in a network and exchange experiences.

To support the emergence of such a dynamic environment in the south west of Europe, 7 universities and 2 aerospace clusters from France, Spain and Portugal have proposed a collaborative project to link their resources, plus 3 ESA-BIC (Business Incubation Centres of the European Space Agency) as associates.

NANOSTAR: a network of excellence among universities, the regional industry and the scientific ecosystem in order to create a leading platform in Europe on nanosatellites.

The challenge of the project is to provide students with the experience of a real space engineering process that includes all stages, from conception and specifications, to design, assembly, integration, testing and documentation. That is, the whole process through a network that combines high-level engineering careers and entrepreneurial ventures in the area of ​​nanosatellites.

2 nanosats freshly operational in space

Isae-Supaero, in collaboration with Onera and the University of Toulouse, has produced EntrySat, a small satellite designed to study the atmospheric re-entry of space debris. This small satellite, a Cubesat of 3 units, was launched on July 3 from the International Space Station.

Furthermore, Robusta-1C MTCube, a cubesat of 1 unit, was launched on July 5 from Soyuz at Vostochny from CSU Montpellier.

Source: https://www.futura-sciences.com/sciences/actualites/debris-spatiaux-entrysat-iss-largue-debris-spatial-mission-inedite-76715/?utm_content=actu&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=futura

 

First preliminary design challenge competition concluded: And the winners are…

MOON INVADERS from Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain).

In this Phase I competitive challenge, 15 multidisciplinary teams of students from the NANOSTAR universities have predesigned a nanosatellite space mission to the Moon. The nanosatellite, equipped with a scientific payload, will perform observations and measurements of the Moon’s surface, while executing a close-distance fly-by.

The total number of registered students has raised to 103 students, which exceedes expectations!

The students have been asked to hand in a design file with the definition of their solution, a preliminary design report, and to showcase their results in a presentation.

The Evaluation Committee, composed of members from all NANOSTAR institutions, have evaluated the received designs and selected the winning proposal. The evaluation has been made based on:

• Compliancy with the top-level requirements of the mission
• Project consistency, risk analysis, and physical soundness
• Maximization of the mission figures of merit
• Solution innovativeness
• Document quality
• Presentation quality
• Team management and organization
• Team size, multidisciplinarity, gender balance, and interinstitutionality
• Correct usage of NANOSTAR resources, tools, and methodology

FIRST PRIZE. Best Team Ranking Top 5:

  1. MOON INVADERS from Universidade da Beira Interior, UBI (Portugal) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Gustavo Ribeiro (UBI); Jorge Benedicto (UPM); Francisca Oliveira (UBI); Flávio Rosa (UBI); Pedro Dente (UBI); Emanuel Castanho (UBI).
  2. CUBESAT CHEFS from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): David Tomás Gaitán Rodríguez; Santiago de la Riva; Javier Gómez del Pulgar Vázquez; Miguel Herrera Arozamena; Alberto Marin Cebrián.
  3. JANUS-X from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Guillermo Escribano; Carlos Paulete; Pau Gago Padreny; Pedro Jiménez; Alejandro Cano Sánchez.
  4. L.U.N.A. from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Inés Gordo Esteban; Javier Cortina Fernández; Manuel Gavilán Herrera; Enrique Díaz Arenas; Javier Bel Diaz.
  5. LASAR-SAT from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Raquel Rodríguez Cañas; Lara Sánchez; Anastasiya Osik; Susana Porras; Adrián Capitán.

Best predesign document:

CUBESAT CHEFS from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): David Tomás Gaitán Rodríguez; Santiago de la Riva; Javier Gómez del Pulgar Vázquez; Miguel Herrera Arozamena; Alberto Marin Cebrián.

Most innovative mission:

JANUS-X from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, UC3M (Spain): Guillermo Escribano; Carlos Paulete; Pau Gago Padreny; Pedro Jiménez; Alejandro Cano Sánchez.

Best management practices:

EIRB’STRONG from ENSEIRB-MATMECA (France): Louis Goutorbe; Louis Grauwin; Olivier Tomas; Oumayma Belkhadra; Pierre Ferrer; Othmane Ahl Zouaoui; Noureddine Khanfir; Amine Alinsafi; Fakhareddine Sabbari.

Best oral presentation:

SELENE from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain): Alejandro Fernández Herrero; David Fernandez Pulido; Ignacio Garcia Guerrero; Gabriel Andújar Saltoratto; Imanol Sardon Delgado; Carlos Rodríguez Jamilena

Congratulations to the winners and all participating student teams!

The First Prize Team has the chance to act as the Lead Systems Engineering Team to coordinate the future NANOSTAR challenges, where their design solution will serve as the baseline to develop and test several subsystems of their nanosatellite across the NANOSTAR institutions. And the team will attend the Symposium on Space Educational Activities (SSEA) at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom) to present their work.

Download the press release

Phase 1 Challenge re-edition

A new preliminary design challenge competition will start in September and will now focus on the design of a nanosatellite mission embedding a living payload for a microgravity experimentation: Roscoff Worms. Again, winners shall receive specific awards like in the previous challenge edition.